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Daily Science Digest

Top science stories featured on ScienceDaily's home page.
  • Bumble bees can experience an object using one sense and later recognize it using another
    The ability to recognize objects across different senses is present in the tiny brains of an insect, researchers have discovered.
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  • Origins of immune system mapped, opening doors for new cancer immunotherapies
    A first cell atlas of the human thymus gland could lead to new immune therapies to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases. Researchers mapped thymus tissue through the human lifespan to understand how it develops and makes vital immune cells called T cells. In the future, this information could help researchers to generate an artificial thymus and engineer improved therapeutic T cells.
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  • Earliest interbreeding event between ancient human populations discovered
    A new study documented the earliest known interbreeding event between ancient human populations -- a group known as the 'super-archaics' in Eurasia interbred with a Neanderthal-Denisovan ancestor about 700,000 years ago. The event was between two populations more distantly related than any other recorded. The authors proposed a revised timeline for human migration out of Africa and into Eurasia. The method for analyzing ancient DNA provides a new way to look farther back into the human...
  • Earth formed much faster than previously thought, new study shows
    By measuring iron isotopes, researchers have shown that our planet originally formed much faster than previously thought. This finding provides new insights on both planetary formation and the likelihood of water and life elsewhere in the universe.
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  • How newborn stars prepare for the birth of planets
    Astronomers used two of the most powerful radio telescopes in the world to create more than three hundred images of planet-forming disks around very young stars in the Orion Clouds. These images reveal new details about the birthplaces of planets and the earliest stages of star formation.
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